Professional Development

Good things come in waves. After a few years at a new high school, your marching band is going great. The booster program is very active and has been raising money. 
Trombones are a critical voice in any band or symphonic ensemble, and compared to most other wind instruments, they are actually pretty simple machines.
It's true that new waves of technology make it easier to access information when you need it and however you need it. Need to learn a quick "hack" — simply Google it, right? 
Michael Pote, an award-winning band director and highly sought-after speaker, clearly demonstrates that success in a large, high-profile program stems from understanding and utilizing the strengths of everyone involved.
It's the night of the beginning band concert, and the curtain will go up soon. You're back stage shepherding all of your students, who are bubbling with nervous excitement, to their chairs. 
In Case Study: A Las Vegas Middle School Orchestra's Remarkable Success, Kathryn Greene outlined how she took her program to unprecedented heights, despite having no prior strings experience. 
Imagine a director asking, "Can you make your sound move the same way you moved your arms?" 
The best recruiters for music programs are our current students. When re­taining music students from middle and elementary schools, your current students serve as the best public relations for your program. 
In How Trumpeter Sean Jones Gets Respect, Jones recounts how he started performing as a child through church. 
Some educators command attention with a booming voice and a larger-than-life presence. Sean Jones employs a completely different tactic that is equally — and probably more — effective. 

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